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Book Covers!
InkMuse
Posted: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 12:59 AM
Joined: 5/8/2011
Posts: 52


I just got my book cover in, and I'm very excited and I wanted to share....


If anyone likes it and is looking to have one made, let me know via email inkmuse.sophia@gmail.com   I'd be happy to introduce you to cover artist for this one. He does freelance work

I guess this fits in this forum, as I think a book cover can be a great marketing tool. At least that's what my readers tell me lol

Atthys Gage
Posted: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 1:12 AM
Joined: 6/7/2011
Posts: 467


Nice. Contrary to what we were all taught, everybody judges a book by its cover. Congratulations, Rebecca.
Katherine Webber
Posted: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 2:02 AM
Joined: 8/22/2011
Posts: 14


Looks great! Congratulations!
InkMuse
Posted: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 2:14 AM
Joined: 5/8/2011
Posts: 52


Thanks

and Atthys, you are right. I recently polled a ton of book bloggers who all admitted that "even though they knew they shouldn't" the do decide on books by covers.
LilySea
Posted: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 1:23 PM
Joined: 5/12/2011
Posts: 241


Beautiful! I'd pick it up and give it a flip-through for certain.

I have to say, I think judging a book by its cover is reasonable and even wise to a certain extent. There is a lot of information to be had on a book cover:

1. Production values: has someone deemed the book worthy of investment? Does it give an overall sense of professionalism?

2. Writer information: who is this person? What else has she written and where? What are her credentials?

3. How does the book compare to others I know better? Writer blurbs, publisher or imprint information, etc. can tell me this.

When it comes to nonfiction, I will flip then to the end notes, index or bibliography to find out what sources the writer used and whether they seem like the appropriate ones to me. That's not the cover exactly, but it's not far from it.

With a fiction book, I'll flip to the middle and read two or three pages. To me, the random middle is the test of good writing. I know writers work on hooks at the beginning, so I skip that. Again, that's not the cover, but it's also not a deep reading of a book.

So whoever said you can't judge a book by its cover was just, plain wrong. Of course you can!
InkMuse
Posted: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 3:46 PM
Joined: 5/8/2011
Posts: 52


Great thoughts! And thank you for the compliment on my cover! I still have work to do on the inside though, and now I feel like I need to "live up to" this awesome cover (which still needs a few tweaks lol)

I have to have a new draft to my editor by the 13th. I keep looking at this cover and it makes me wary of the book LOL. I wanted to update this site with revised chapters, but it's not working on my end for some reason. I contacted tech support.

Anyway, again, great contribution to the thread with your thoughts.

Here is how I pick a book:

1) Look for a cover that catches my eye. (and/or title)
2) Look for ratings
3) Read blurb
4) Read Reviews
5) Read a sample

Not saying they have to land it across the mark, but 1 and 3 and 5 are pretty important. If the cover and title don't catch my eye, I'm not gonna pick it up in the first place (unless it was recommended to me). If the premise doesn't interest me, I'll pass. If the writing does hold up, I abandon ship.
Marshall R Maresca
Posted: Friday, September 9, 2011 4:05 PM
Joined: 3/7/2011
Posts: 56


InkMuse-- Are you planning on self-publishing then?
InkMuse
Posted: Saturday, September 10, 2011 1:02 PM
Joined: 5/8/2011
Posts: 52


I don't know for sure yet. Waiting to hear back from Penguin and Harlequin, but I did tell my "list" that if I didn't have a publisher by 2012, I'd self publish. The rejections I have heard back on have all been along the lines of saying it was publication quality, but they didn't have a spot on their "list" and to please submit my next book to them. So, not entirely helpful. That said, there are some things I'd like to address before publication, and I've had some wonderful editors from publishing houses to help me. We'll see what happens. I just don't want to get sucked into another year or two of waiting when I'm being asked on a daily basis where my book can be purchased. The good news is that even if I self publish, I should be able to get my book on shelves at Barnes and Nobles and also a couple book shops in Canada
LilySea
Posted: Saturday, September 10, 2011 2:08 PM
Joined: 5/12/2011
Posts: 241


And it sounds like your "next book" could go a traditional route and you end up with a mix. Not bad at all. Good luck and keep us posted.
InkMuse
Posted: Saturday, September 10, 2011 2:22 PM
Joined: 5/8/2011
Posts: 52


Thanks, Lily

I don't mind either way. The reasons I want trad pub have never been "bragging rights" -- only to have professional editing, a professional cover, and to be in brick and mortar stores. (which is also why I don't query small or medium sized publishers... they're book covers aren't as nice as I'd like, and they don't allow you to provide your own) Since I've paid for editing myself, that just left cover and stores, and now I have those things handled as well. If I end up self publishing and it goes well, then I'll probably want a pretty good advance to consider traditional publishing at that point. I just know too many people right now who went traditional and aren't happy. I'm not saying I'd be one of them, but I'm open to experiencing both to see what I like more.
Atthys Gage
Posted: Saturday, September 10, 2011 3:53 PM
Joined: 6/7/2011
Posts: 467


Rebecca; I'd be curious to hear more about your experience with a professional editor (if you don't mind sharing). Most professional editors I've scoped out ask around 4 buck a page, which is really prohibitive, though I have had publisher say 'well, you're close to being ready, Maybe a professional editor could, blah, blah...' Even if $1600 were affordable, how do you know what you are getting. How did you choose?

Atthys
InkMuse
Posted: Saturday, September 10, 2011 4:49 PM
Joined: 5/8/2011
Posts: 52


The first editors I worked with were Sol Stein and his sister Toby. I will say they were invaluable in helping me to hone in on my voice, simplify my style, and help with characterization. The price was more than pricey, but I did learn a lot in the short amount of time I worked with them. It was after working with them that I started to get attention from agents and publishers spotting my work online.

After that, I worked with another editor who charged me $200 for my full MS. This is only because I was referred to her and because she'd seen my work and knew it didn't need a lot of work. She helped me mostly with world-building and content.

The editor I am working with now charges $3 a page for what I am looking for help with. IE--my opening chapters have definitely hooked publishers and agents--enough for them to see my work online and contact me. I think this is saying lot. All were top agents and publishers. But I lose them after that, which means things aren't holding up enough. I am being very critical of my book right now. I realized yesterday I have a huge "calm" between chapters 7 and 11. Not completely calm, but just not "building" as it should be. I want to get that resolved before sending the first 100 pages out to my current editors.

How do I know what I am getting into? I use editors that are known and well respected or that have been recommended to me by someone I trust. My rejections have all been along the lines of me being "close, BUT" ... the but being anything from needing to tighten things up a tad (recently revamped my opening chapters from 20k to 12k), or needing to develop the town more (have worked on that as well) or just saying it's very competently written, but they just didn't fall in love with it the way they need to, but that they think another agent or publisher will (some agents have even recommended me to other agents).

I get it. I'm close, but I'm not there. And I won't publish until I *am* there. For me, it's more a matter of story than writing. My writing and my voice have been endlessly complimented by industry "professionals". Indeed, I'd make a better editor lol. But I know there concerns can be addressed.... so I will address them and get my book out there, one way or another.

We'll see what Harlequin and Penguin say (both have asked to see my full after reading a sample online here, at Book Country), but if it's a rejection, I'll live. They have my old version, which in retrospect seems like junk (at least to me).
LilySea
Posted: Saturday, September 10, 2011 11:14 PM
Joined: 5/12/2011
Posts: 241


All of that is very hopeful, InkMuse. Seems like it's just a matter of hanging in there and continuing to work and you will get somewhere you want to be--one way or another.
InkMuse
Posted: Sunday, September 11, 2011 3:27 AM
Joined: 5/8/2011
Posts: 52


Thanks! As long as the people who ultimately buy my book feel like they are buying something on par with traditionally published books, then I'm happy. I understand it's harder to break in that it used to be for debut novelists and that sometimes it's just a matter of showing what you can do first. I guess my problem might be that if I got an offer AFTER I was doing well on my own, I wouldn't know what I'd want to do. It must be hard for authors in those situations not to feel "used". But if the publisher can offer more than you can give yourself, that's another story.

I'm sure I might have better luck with smaller publishing houses, but I decided I rather no go that route. I may be jumping the gun since there is still editorial interest out there that I haven't heard back on, but I just don't feel as hopeful about my old MS as I do about it now that i've made some major changes.

What I'm most excited about right now is getting this MS out to the editor I'm working with. This should be the last round I need, and is focused on making sure I maintain my "hooks" throughout the MS so I don't lose the reader between my bigger scenes.
LilySea
Posted: Sunday, September 11, 2011 4:10 AM
Joined: 5/12/2011
Posts: 241


hmmm... interest after doing well on your own...I don't think I'd feel used in those circumstances unless I was doing really, really, really well. After all, traditional publishers offer a lot in terms of services, experience, knowledge of the industry, etc. Even a writer doing moderately well alone might like to have all that packaged for her. Like hiring a rental property manager (you know, in a highly theoretical universe in which I have both a good self-published writing career AND rental property!).

It's hard to break in, but it's also hard to stay. I don't know enough about the world of self-publishing to know how "staying" successful there compares in difficulty with staying successful in the traditional realm. But it does seem like the smart money is on mixed-use of these vehicles in the future for the best career chances.

My own hope is to go traditional first, then use self-publishing as a marketing vehicle as well as a way to publish things less likely to be of interest to traditional publishers for whatever reason. I know success on your own can impress the old houses, but success in the old houses could also help boost self-pubbed sales, right?

Anyway, we are all making this up as we go along these days. Things are changing so fast! It's good to keep an eye on each other to see how different approaches go for folks. I think I'm mainly so old-school, because I grew up with a father in traditional publishing. So it's kind of my brass ring. Maybe over the years I'll shift, though. You never know!
InkMuse
Posted: Sunday, September 11, 2011 2:01 PM
Joined: 5/8/2011
Posts: 52


Yeah, I hear you on that. One thing I'm interested is in the foreign market, since I've had interest in Poland and from those who prefer to read a book in Spanish. And I know they can sometimes offer nice advances and other perks. It's all about weighing things out. I have heard in the news some who have taken deals after self publishing. Some of my favorite books I found out recently were originally self published! I wouldn't have guessed. And then there are are weighed things out and decided not to take a deal. I think there will always be different factors to consider. Self publishing isn't the death sentence it used to me, and many normally attained novels do completely flop. There are no sure things in publishing these days, and yet it seems that is what publishers are looking for. What comes down to is I have a commercial writing style, but I don't have a commercial story. I dare paint Wiccan as Wiccans instead of as evil witches. I probably offend parts of the Christian community (which is most of the country lol) by showing the cultish side of Christianity and having my character say that is not real christianity. That right there is enough to put off most agents and publishers. But I seek to write the truth. I've gotten mixed reactions about my character -- from love to hate -- so I'm sure that plays a role for those who are the hate on side. There's a lot of people who have to personally LOVE your book in order to buy it -- people who have read more samples of books than your average readers. As they say, marketing is everything. It's not really, you still have to have a great product, but no one knows about your product if they've never heard about it. That's one of the reason traditionally published books do well. Take that leverage away from them, and you have a slightly more even playing field (not saying that is possible, or that it can be done, or that anyone has done that. Just my observation.)

Publishers are looking for a reason to say no. Readers are looking for a reason to say yes. I didn't use to think this was true, back when I was the sunshine and rainbows new writer who thought all good books made it and only people will crap books self published. Now I have to eat my hat, as I myself have purchased self published books and loved them without even realizing it! One writer I know was told by a publisher that they loved everything about his book, but his style and theme were too much like two other famous authors that they publish. Basically, they'd be putting more competition against their own authors. (IMO, they maybe should have thought that idea through a little more).

He did get picked up by a smaller publisher. I've had deals from smaller publishers as well, but I'm not interested. And I have NOTHING against small publishers. It's just that there are few people I am willing to relinquish "control" of my book to. If they offered more of what I wanted in a publisher, then I'd go for it. Leaves me more time to focus on the writing itself. But they don't, so there it is.

What it comes down to for me is "no room on the list" or "tighten up the opening chapters" as reasons to pass on my book aren't really reasons enough for me to think it's not ready for publications. My voice and my writing, my characters and descriptions -- all these things have been endlessly complimented by industry professionals. (I keep screen shots sop I don't sound like I'm talking out my ass lol) But as they say, it's all about story. And what it come down to is that I needed to tighten up my opening, like they said, and I need to increase the outward danger in other parts of my story. Maybe they didn't think it was something I could pull off ;P But these are the things I'm working on now, and I can CLEARLY see why they didn't think my book was ready. And I COULD resubmit, but I don't want to wait another 6-12 months to hear back. My readers have been asking for 3 months now where they can buy my book. Countless others said they went to go find it but can't find it anywhere (assuming it was already published after reading a sample online). This is why I've decided to put my money where my mouth is. I will pay for the editing (and I don't just mean proofreading) that a traditional publisher would have bought me. I paid for a professional cover. I will pay for professional marketing. I will pay for book runs and I will call my contacts at Barnes and Nobles and other book stores.

It costs money to make money. Not everyone can afford to put that kind of money out front.... that's the great thing about traditional publishers. But "no room on our list" IMO isn't a sign a book isn't ready for publication. Or, in the case of my friend, it's a sign they think your book is competition. That's a pretty good compliment, and all the more reason to get your book out there.
Marshall R Maresca
Posted: Sunday, September 11, 2011 2:55 PM
Joined: 3/7/2011
Posts: 56


"No room on our list" tends to mean, "It's publishable, just not by us."

And there are some good small publishers, and there are also a lot that are actually significantly worse than self-publishing.
InkMuse
Posted: Sunday, September 11, 2011 6:12 PM
Joined: 5/8/2011
Posts: 52


Yes, Marshall, that is how I took it, too. They've even said that explicitly a few times "we're certain you will find..."

But when it comes to small publishers, I haven't found one that I want to submit to. And it's not that I haven't found any good small publishers. There are many! I think it just depends what you want done for you and what you want to do for yourself, and who you are willing to let do what for you. (have I lost you yet? lol)

I have very mixed feelings about self publishing, and I think that is what plays into my internal fears about going forward with it. Will I be "that writer". (The ones I have in the past thought to myself... "No wonder they self published?") Karma's a bit.... right?

But at this point, I think it wouldn't hurt to show that the book can stand up. It's more than just writing and voice, it's a story. I will bring that out as much as I can before I publish. I don't want to put crap out there to my readers--they've read samples and I want to live up to their expectations. I have offered free copies to many people and everyone has said they prefer to buy a copy. I am honestly in awe at the support, and maybe now I can see why people self publish. Quality is important to me, but I have to remember that quality and "being commercial" aren't the same thing. Not being "commercial" doesn't mean not being "publishable".

It's like the whole horror genre at this point. I'm a huge fan, but it's hard to find traditionally published horror books these days (compared to other genres). The selection isn't as wide. I doubt it's because horror writers are worse writers on the whole than writers in other genres, especially not considering the talent I've seen in horror writers I beta read for. Why is this? It's because horror isn't one of the "it" genres right now. That doesn't mean it's not publishable or that no one is buying. It just means it will be harder for a book to find a publisher, and that has nothing to do with quality.

With self publishing, what it comes down to, IMO, is making sure what you're putting out there is worth someone spending their money on. I hope my readers will feel I've done that. I figure if I can get this many industry pros to query me, then I might be off to a good start. It's just a matter of making sure I carry out, and that's why I think it's worth it (to me) to hire pro editors.

I could have gotten free editing from the smaller publishers who were interested, but I wouldn't have gotten a cover design I could love, and that was really important to me, however shallow that may be. I rather pay for the professional editing.
LilySea
Posted: Sunday, September 11, 2011 8:10 PM
Joined: 5/12/2011
Posts: 241


I can feel you on that fence! I will be very interested to follow your progress and watch this path as you blaze it.

I've done a little freelance editing for self-publishers and it's been disheartening to watch. Not many sales at all. But those folks weren't very hooked into a literary community and it sounds like you are.

If I self-published I think I could sell 100 books to people who are very interested in my writing now. But I can't say it would get beyond that without some serious marketing investment. If I manage to get a "real" advance from a traditional publisher, I will turn it over to a good, solid marketer. But I just don't have the cash flow to do that without the money up front.

It's a bit of a catch-22, I guess.
InkMuse
Posted: Sunday, September 11, 2011 10:39 PM
Joined: 5/8/2011
Posts: 52


I do a lot of freelance editing myself--to be honest, it's how I pay for editing. I need structural. The people who contact me need line editing and to learn how to apply writing technique. I've seen a mix. Some people who are very talented and later go on to get traditional publishing deals, and those who are a lot of work for me and I'm not sure what will happen in the future.

I also know a mix of self published authors, though I can't say I know many who have only sold few copies. But there is a lot to it that I believe a lot of people who just 'throw their work up there' don't understand. If you get a worthwhile traditional publisher, they should be doing the marketing for you

But I understand how hard it is if you don't have money, which I guess puts me at an unfair advantage. Still, it's not like I can compete with major publishers on the same level, though. All I can do is try to get my book out there by the means I have. It may be more than most, but I'm delusional enough to think it's the same as traditional publishing. There are advantages and disadvantages to both. I weighed my option, which in the end were resubmit to those who I almost made it with the first time around, or get on with my writing life. I can't put another year into this book just "sitting around" only so it can "sit around more waiting for publication" when the hype for the book is here *now*. -- and I'm by no means impatient. I've been working on this book for going on 4 years. I don't think I'll need to do that with future books, but this book needed it. I don't want to wait another 2 years until it's *possibly* put on shelves, especially since my readers don't want that either.

Besides, it's not the last book I'll ever write. There will be other chances to try traditional publishing. Everyone who has narrowly turned down my book has asked to see the next book. The problem is that my others books are either 1) not in the same genre or 2) part of the same series. All my contemporary fantasy novels right now are part of the series. The rest of my work is literary or literary horror, so that would mean different agents and acquisition editors.
Marshall R Maresca
Posted: Monday, September 12, 2011 2:36 AM
Joined: 3/7/2011
Posts: 56


Do you have an agent yet, or are you submitting to these publishers directly?
InkMuse
Posted: Monday, September 12, 2011 3:46 AM
Joined: 5/8/2011
Posts: 52


The publishers contacted me, Marshall. 1 saw my work on Authonomy (Harper Collins), the other two saw my work on here (Penguin and Harlequin).

I was also hooked up with Darley Anderson Literary Agency after being scouted off Authonomy and hooked up with Deirdre Knight through here as well.

I have nothing but great things to say about these people. In the end, I narrowly missed for one reason or another. Same with the agents I submitted to, some of whom were so sure I'd land an agent that they referred me to other agents who weren't open for submissions at the time, thinking they would like my work.

My thing at this point is clearly my MS has issues once they get past what they see posted online. And I'm starting to see what those issues are more and more. They don't have the time (and I don't blame them) to help me work through them... or maybe they think I can't pull it off, who knows. Others it's been an issue of them just not having room on their "list" but saying that they were "sure another agent or editor will feel differently". As I said, some even referred me to these "other agents or editors".

But it's been months with some of them, and I haven't heard back. I sent a nudge email to Harlequin and Penguin awhile back (Penguin I was offering to send an updated MS, but they didn't respond. Harlequin told me to nudge if I didn't hear back after 2 weeks, and I waited more like 4-6 before nudging). It's a REALLY slow process.

And it's not that I mind entirely, it's just that I'd like someone to work with me on what needs to be fixed (I realize ALL--or at least almost all!--books need it before they hit shelves). I want to get it out there while I still have the reader support base. Whether I get the help I need for free by being acquired or through a paid editor, it's the same difference to me. At this point, at least I know my writing is where it needs to be and that I have a good premise. My problem is somewhere in the middle, and I think largely has to do with pacing and shuffling some ideas around for increased impact. I'm working on that now, and I can see why people haven't been jumping up and down to help me with this. It's got to be the HARDEST part of editing a novel, and probably one of the most important to get "right".
InkMuse
Posted: Monday, September 12, 2011 3:54 AM
Joined: 5/8/2011
Posts: 52


I still have a good pool of agents considering and these two publishers, but I'm learned that some people don't respond, even if they normally do. Others respond very slowly (some taking 6-9 months to get back to you!). I just am not sure how much more time I want to spend "futzing around". I want to be WORKING on my novel and then getting it out there. Not sending emails only to be told "we don't have room for this, but someone else might" or "we really love this, but there's this one problem you need to fix..." Okay, so let me fix it, ya know? But it's not like that. Instead, you have to start over again at the beginning, meaning another 6-12 months of waiting. That is what I don't want to do again. I am SO thankful for the feedback, but I don't want to resubmit. If I didn't have readers interested, that would be another thing entirely. But I have book stores asking how they can go about stocking my book. I'd be an idiot (at least I think so) not to just make it happen on my own before the desire for my book fizzles out. and that means spending my book-working hours WORKING on my book. If someone contacts me in the meantime, great, but I'm not holding my breath

Plus, I have some other projects I want to work on. Maybe I'll query those when they're ready, maybe I won't. I just know me, and me could wait in limbo with my book for YEARS. I have to choose a date that I am making the "end" and follow through and move on. So that's what I'm gonna do. I will openly welcome the naysayers to laugh at me if my book fails. Total possibility. After all, if it was really that great, I'd have made it the last mile, right? But I'll never know if I don't try.
LilySea
Posted: Monday, September 12, 2011 1:20 PM
Joined: 5/12/2011
Posts: 241


Well, as you said, traditionally published books fail too. It's all quite risky.
InkMuse
Posted: Monday, September 12, 2011 3:57 PM
Joined: 5/8/2011
Posts: 52


So true. This is why I completely understand the publisher's POV. They want a sure thing. Sometimes that means a book that's already selling well. There's actually a site that lists all the famous bestselling books that were originally turned down by all major publishers and then self published BEFORE being picked up by a publisher. That's pretty rare, I think, but it wasn't as rare as I thought. I also consider that out of traditionally published books, it's still rare for books to become best sellers. (One thing to keep in mind is that certain best selling lists can only be made if there is a "publisher", which often means owning enough ISBN's to be considered a publisher by those lists in order to be allowed on those lists). There's definitely a lot to the business end of things. Thankfully I know quite a bit about that, but when that fails, I have a tremendous amount of connections. My husband is helpful just because he is a successful business owner, and then we have connections (we each have friends in the film industry who have been very supportive of my 'career' -- if you can call it that). Then connections with book bloggers, readers, booksellers, and even some international connections. Can't underestimate networking! that said, the networking is nice, but I won't utilize it until I'm satisfied the book is "ready". I suppose it would be considered "ready" if I'd taken the offers from the smaller publishers, but I think I am at times pickier then some publishers (just obviously not the major players, at least not the 1/3 that have rejected me so far!)
Debbie
Posted: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 6:33 PM
Joined: 4/26/2011
Posts: 8


The beauty of self-pubbing though, is that we don't have to be commercial. We can afford to take a chance on ourselves, whereas the big publishers can't. I only wish I'd gone indie sooner!

I love the colour in that cover, btw, Becca. It's that bluey purply shade that really sings!
InkMuse
Posted: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 8:23 PM
Joined: 5/8/2011
Posts: 52


Awe, thanks Debbie
Debbie
Posted: Thursday, September 15, 2011 7:37 PM
Joined: 4/26/2011
Posts: 8


I bet when you get the actual cover on a book, you'll want to stroke it lovingly...

I can almost feel the texture of that cloak even on a computer screen!
Annabelle R Charbit
Posted: Tuesday, September 20, 2011 2:36 AM
Joined: 4/26/2011
Posts: 55


Love it!
Thanks for sharing and congratulations
Annabelle
http://www.ridiculouslife.net/index.html
snurf
Posted: Friday, December 9, 2011 7:24 AM
Joined: 2/27/2011
Posts: 18


Hi!

Guess it's time for me to come out of the closet here on BC
I design book covers, ads, promotional materials and merchandise for
authors. My service is called Book Graphics and you are  very welcome to
rummage through my site, look at the samples of my custom work, and
browse through my large stock of pre-made covers. The URL is http://bookgraphics.wordpress.com/ ;;

Enjoy

p.s. Snag my recipe for CHRISTMAS SOUP while you're there - it's at the bottom of the home page.

InkMuse
Posted: Sunday, December 11, 2011 1:03 PM
Joined: 5/8/2011
Posts: 52


I have some updated covers!

I decided to do different covers for print and ebook for various reasons.

so here are the print and ebook versions of two of my books (photography for both by the same guy. Send me a message on twitter @inkuse if you want his info. His prices are outstanding!)

The Forever Girl:
Print: http://i807.photobucket.com/albums/yy357/inkmuse/PrintTFG.jpg
eBook: http://i807.photobucket.com/albums/yy357/inkmuse/eBookTFG-2.jpg

Her Sweetest Downfall:
Print: http://i807.photobucket.com/albums/yy357/inkmuse/PrintSD.jpg
eBook: http://i807.photobucket.com/albums/yy357/inkmuse/eBookSD.jpg
snurf
Posted: Friday, December 16, 2011 12:33 PM
Joined: 2/27/2011
Posts: 18


FYI - My article 'Collaborating to Make a Great Book Cover' is now posted on the BOOK COUNTRY BLOG - http://bookcountry.com/Industry/Article.aspx?articleId=123728

kjmiller
Posted: Wednesday, June 11, 2014 3:40 PM

I put a lot of effort into my making the cover for the book I put up here.

 

 

The people on Book Country who are writing the type of books I want to write ,.... are putting no  effort into their covers.

 

Yeah, in a perfect world everyone would fall in love with you alone for your wonderful prose.

 

However, until then try putting a little more effort into being a salesperson.


Mimi Speike
Posted: Wednesday, June 11, 2014 8:39 PM
Joined: 11/17/2011
Posts: 1014


I have my hands full revising my book. I'll deal with a cover when that process is complete. One step at a time is the way I'm taking it. I suspect that others feel as I do.

.

 

 


jesse cook
Posted: Wednesday, June 18, 2014 3:52 PM
Joined: 6/10/2014
Posts: 1


heres the book cover for a book im working on, "The Kings Key"

 

http://i.imgur.com/fDdYOVN.png

--edited by jesse cook on 6/18/2014, 3:54 PM--


Yellowcake
Posted: Monday, June 23, 2014 9:27 PM
Joined: 1/23/2014
Posts: 44


Gday Jesse. Im glad I found this thread. I love a good cover.

 

There's some nice photographic composition going on with your cover here, however I can't help feeling that the typography is letting you, and the image down. 

 

Why not try using a large bold face, then place the imagery in front of the heading (mid space) then the subhead in front in a smaller size. 

 

Get rid of the effects. With photoshop, gimp and the hoist of other programs out there these days it's all to easy to over do the "emboss, gradient, drop shadows" and so on. But all that can happen is that you lose legibility and, when it comes to it, a simple and strong typeface is a timeless typeface. Maybe explore a  'Garamond', or 'Trajan Pro'... 'Aurea Inline' could be nice too. 

 

I'd Also drop sub head "A STORY OF ... "  just run with main heading (ill try to do it in text). Either that or find a different word, or drop 'KEY" in the sub i.e. Conspiracies and Kingdoms

 

 THE KINGS

 K E Y

 [hero image]

Conspiracies 

and Kingdoms

  Jesse L Cook 

 

Hope that the text thing above works when I hit submit. Id be more than happy to knock something up for you.

 

(Edit ... meh they didn't... )

Now, I better read that manuscript too eh . Feel free to tell me to bugger off at any time.

Cheers

Al

 

 

 

--edited by Yellowcake on 6/23/2014, 9:30 PM--


Mimi Speike
Posted: Tuesday, June 24, 2014 1:21 PM
Joined: 11/17/2011
Posts: 1014


To all that yellowcake says, I'd like to add:

.

The cover you have created doesn't give me a feel for the story. The title sounds like it's an alternative world historical/fantasy, but the girl is dressed in a contemporary-looking sundress. The type is too gimmicky, very hard to read. Your name should not be larger than your title unless you're an established presence. Overall, your solution does not make the best use of the available space. Reworking the type as yellowcake suggests would help a good deal.

 

--edited by Mimi Speike on 6/24/2014, 6:18 PM--