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POV do you like a multiple POV or singular POV?
Joani Davis
Posted: Wednesday, June 19, 2013 5:30 PM
Joined: 4/3/2013
Posts: 20


What do you prefer. Do you like your story told from several POV's, or do you like just one POV?

Have you had to rework or change your POV due to a strong character's developement or plot needs?


Stacy B
Posted: Wednesday, June 19, 2013 7:13 PM
Joined: 6/12/2013
Posts: 3


I think that depends on the story being told.  With 1st person, we are limited to what we can know about the story.  We can only know what your main character or whoever is telling the story knows.  So I would say I preferred several POVs or omniscient POV.  I read somewhere that beginning writers usually write in 1st person's POV.  However, in my limited experience, I found 1st POV to be more difficult to write in.  As to your second question, I have reworked my POV more than once.  The whole 1st chapter is wrote in 1st.  But then it changes.  To give life to more characters I had to switch.  I was torn on going back and changing it all, which I had already done several times, and will probably do many more, or just tell the story as I felt it  needed to be told.

Joani Davis
Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2013 1:34 AM
Joined: 4/3/2013
Posts: 20


I am having the same issue with POV. In my current book I have the dilema with needing to get the backstory told. I have morphed my first chapter several times and changed the POV in an effort to make it blend in with the rest of the story. I feel I am getting closer, and I know I have to get it right so that the reader is engaged in the story from the beginning.
Toni Smalley
Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2013 2:52 AM
I like multiple POV, because I feel I get to connect on a deeper level with more than just the main character. It is interesting to see how each character views certain situations that are occurring, and the contrasts of opinions between characters can be very entertaining.

Third person omniscient seems less personable to me. I prefer third person limited. One of my stories, Smoke and Needles, started in 3rd person limited, and a few thousands words in I realized it would work better in first. It is a funny story, and I think comedic stories work well when told from first person. 

Weird thing is, I like third person limited/multiple POV better than first person, yet I am better at writing in first person. I'm trying to write in 3rd person for a story I'm working on and it's tough sometimes. I just bought Characters and Viewpoint by Orson Scott Card and plan on working out my issues in this area, because it seems to be my week point. I feel like I have really good stories, but am limited by the fact I struggle with knowing how to use the mechanics of POV properly. And, that is a good point. We all can become better writers if we take time to hone our ability to use the writing tools necessary to deliver a story.

@Joani: Hi Joani From the writing advice I've read, backstory is best left out in the first chapter. In order to engage the reader right away, they say you should start with action (not meaning an explosion or high speed car chase; it can be subtle as long as movement is occurring). The backstory can be worked in as the story is told, and you don't always need to provide the entire backstory. Only what the reader needs to know at the moment.


Joani Davis
Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2013 12:39 PM
Joined: 4/3/2013
Posts: 20


Toni,
Slowly but surely I am trying to shift the backstory out of the first chapter and have come a long way. However, the way the story is set up I feel the need to give the reader a bit of the back story so they know why the main character behaves the way she does. Its a balancing act and I am working staying on the wire. LOL
LeeAnna Holt
Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2013 8:08 PM
Joined: 4/30/2011
Posts: 662


There are actually a few options inside first and third person. You have first person present (I sit.), first person past (I sat.), third person present (She sits.), third person past (She sat.), and third person omniscient (already mentioned).

I've seen all of these used. First person present seems to be a pretty strong trend right now with YA dystopias even though most of the characters aren't compelling enough to carry the POV.

Third person present is a favorite of the writer Chuck Wendig if you want an example. It allows the writer to swap view points while giving the story a more urgent pace.

So far I use third limited, even if I'm not swapping POV. I've thought about trying first, but I don't like using it too much. It's just a personal thing for me. I'm thinking about giving first and third present a shot just for giggles. Don't know if I'd actually publish anything in it.
Toni Smalley
Posted: Friday, June 21, 2013 12:28 AM
@Joani: Gotcha. Good luck staying on the wire
MariAdkins
Posted: Tuesday, July 23, 2013 5:10 PM
Stacy B wrote:
With 1st person, we are limited to what we can know about the story.  We can only know what your main character or whoever is telling the story knows.
I've done the same thing with 3rd person. So have many others. Limited omniscient isn't limited (ha ha ha) to 1st person.

Limited omniscient is a beautiful thing.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Limited_omniscient_point_of_view 

--edited by MariAdkins on 7/23/2013, 5:13 PM--


Stacy B
Posted: Monday, August 5, 2013 9:06 AM
Joined: 6/12/2013
Posts: 3


Hi Mari,

 

Sorry I missed this earlier. I stand corrected, you are absolutely right.


LeeAnna Holt
Posted: Tuesday, August 6, 2013 8:32 PM
Joined: 4/30/2011
Posts: 662


I learned that beginning writers shouldn't really try using omniscient in any form because it is quite difficult to use successfully. Omniscient is the easiest to make a muddled wreck of your prose. It can also suffer from extreme head hopping.
 

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