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Have a new Literary Fiction project to workshop on Book Country? Need readers? Share here.
Nevena Georgieva
Posted: Tuesday, July 16, 2013 11:29 AM
Joined: 2/9/2012
Posts: 438


Hi there, literary aficionados! 

Literary Fiction was just added to the Book Country Genre Map, and I assume most of you are new here. If you have a newly-posted manuscript on Book Country, and are seeking readers & feedback, here's the place to talk about it. 


Welcome!


Nevena


Book Country Coordinator


MariAdkins
Posted: Wednesday, July 17, 2013 3:53 PM

I started Midnight with all intention of it being literary. But then the vampires arrived ... It's still kinda literary but not so much as it once was.

 

Make sense? LOL


Rebecca Ramsey
Posted: Tuesday, July 23, 2013 3:42 PM
Joined: 7/23/2013
Posts: 1


I just joined the site after reading about it in Publisher's Weekly.  Hope to see more happening in the Literary Fiction section.  I am still working on my own manuscript, but I would love to start reviewing some.
Charles
Posted: Tuesday, July 23, 2013 4:48 PM
Joined: 7/23/2013
Posts: 5


In the world of Paranormal, vampires, and murder mystery, it's difficult to stand out. I wonder how are other literary fiction writers getting noticed? I'm currently at work on my own novel, The Road to Astroworld. It has been most difficult to find beta readers.
Lucy Silag
Posted: Wednesday, July 24, 2013 11:50 AM
Joined: 6/7/2013
Posts: 1359


Hello and a big welcome to Rebecca and Charles! So exciting to have you here on Book Country!

 

Yes, I definitely want to encourage folks to post their work in the new literary categories (as well as the categories that have always been a part of book country, like SciFi, Fantasy, Romance, Horror, and Mystery). I am so excited to see these areas of the site grow.

 

For everyone that is looking for "Literary Fiction" to read and review, and not finding a lot of listings for that yet, I would say to look around in mystery and historical fiction as well. I am seeing titles there, such as FIRES OF HALCYON by RCGravelle, that overlap with what I think of as LitFic. I am actually reading and reviewing FIRES OF HALCYON right now. It is terrific!

 

And @Charles, if you are looking for beta readers, you've come to the right place. I am going to post this link to your profile so that folks who see this thread can go right to your page . . . and check to see if you have posted any excerpts of THE ROAD TO ASTROWORLD for us to look at! Looking forward to when you do.

 

Let me know if you need any help using Book Country, and again, welcome!

 

Lucy Silag

Book Country Community and Engagement Manager


--edited by Lucy Silag on 7/24/2013, 11:51 AM--


Charles
Posted: Thursday, July 25, 2013 6:09 AM
Joined: 7/23/2013
Posts: 5


Thank you Lucy. I posted the entire thing. I don't know If that's what I was supposed to do. Of course people don't have to read all of it I guess. I'm new and feeling my way around. But thanks so much for posting the link.
Lucy Silag
Posted: Thursday, July 25, 2013 7:46 AM
Joined: 6/7/2013
Posts: 1359


Hi Charles! It's definitely okay to post your whole book. Some members can read it all at once, some members can read the beginning and come back to it, and some members might only read a portion. As far as I've been able to see since I've been at Book Country, members will usually be pretty specific about what section they read. And if you have questions for a member who gives you feedback, you can always ask in the comment section at the bottom of the review.

 

Good luck and I am looking forward to checking out your book!

 

Lucy


Charles
Posted: Saturday, July 27, 2013 5:00 AM
Joined: 7/23/2013
Posts: 5


Hello I recently reviewed a book. However now I'm not seeing where I've reviewed anything. My dashboard is showing that I need to do a peer review. Now I did delete a version of my book. Perhaps all of my activity was tied to the version I deleted.
Bobbi Srathcarol
Posted: Monday, September 9, 2013 10:34 AM
Joined: 9/7/2013
Posts: 1


Hi. I just learned about Book Country, having been inspired by the On The Media story yesterday. I have two books I need to get into shape in order to post them here. One is a 673-page baggy monster, and the other is more of a novella at 150 pages or under. The latter is my take on Sleeping Beauty. I don't know whether that would be pigeonholed as YA, but I prefer to think of it as (ahem) Literary Fantasy.

When introducing a book, should you add an introduction of sorts (favorite authors, inspirations)? Or should you just post the MS cold and let people read it without preconceived notions??


A.E. Skeen
Posted: Monday, September 9, 2013 10:58 AM
Joined: 9/8/2013
Posts: 7


Hello Everyone,

I just signed up for Book Country after hearing a NPR piece on it.  I've been writing for years and years but I've not published my fiction. I've been in several writer's seminars with noted authors, but somehow I never felt it all coming together in a way I wanted to publish.  By now, though, I think I'm ready.  I also publish (under another name) in history and cultural studies.

 

I'm working on a couple fiction projects now-- I write literary fiction and science fiction.  I  thought I would start by posting a short story.  It's called "House Guests" and I look forward to hearing what people think of it.  This is the nub of a book centered on the character named Elizabeth.

 

I look forward to reading other people's work too.

 

Sincerely,

 

A.E. Skeen


Lucy Silag
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2013 5:32 PM
Joined: 6/7/2013
Posts: 1359


Hi, @AE! So glad the NPR piece brought you our way!

 

I just sent you a connection request so that we can be in touch about any questions that you might have. Let me know if you need anything!

 

Lucy Silag

Book Country Community and Engagement Manager


Ront
Posted: Wednesday, September 18, 2013 6:23 PM
Joined: 9/11/2013
Posts: 3


Hello All,

I recently joined Book Country after hearing about it on NPR (like another newcomer here), and I am looking to get more connected.  I have had the pleasure of reviewing a couple of stories, and I have since uploaded my manuscript, the Memory Place, to the site.  I would very much love to get some feedback on it-- even if you don't read the whole thing (it's often helpful to know where things got weird/boring and you just couldn't go on...).  At any rate, I am very excited about being part of the community, and I'm looking forward to making more literary connections!


Mimi Speike
Posted: Wednesday, September 18, 2013 7:54 PM
Joined: 11/17/2011
Posts: 1014


Hello Ront,

.

Literary fiction is where my heart is. I call my thing Fantasy/Humor, for they did not have Literary Fiction when I joined. I actually regard it as Literary Humor, although it is Fantasy for sure. 

.

I will look at your work. Us literary types have to stick together. We're way in the minority here.

.

--edited by Mimi Speike on 9/18/2013, 8:28 PM--


Ront
Posted: Thursday, September 19, 2013 8:30 AM
Joined: 9/11/2013
Posts: 3


Hi Mimi,

 

Thanks so much for reviewing.  If you have something posted just let me know where to find it and the title.  Happy to give it a read!


Mimi Speike
Posted: Thursday, September 19, 2013 11:21 AM
Joined: 11/17/2011
Posts: 1014


I will read your thing this weekend. My own piece, Sly! The Rogue Reconsidered is the same version I put up originally, a year and a half ago. You will see that I got a ton of criticism on it. I have made no changes to it, although I am working on rewriting a more active opening and breaking up the (I admit it) huge amount of backstory. I find that material highly entertaining, others do not. I would be glad to know what you think. 

.

It would be enough, if you find you can't take it, to hear at what point you stopped. But, if my first chapter is too much for you, please take a peek at two or three pages of chapter two, for that is where the live action really begins.


Lucy Silag
Posted: Friday, September 20, 2013 2:42 PM
Joined: 6/7/2013
Posts: 1359


Welcome, @Ront! Just sent you a connection request so that we can be in touch over private message--I will send you some links to help you get started on the site. Looks like you are well on your way.

 

Looking forward to checking out your work!! Let me know if you need any help with anything.

 

Lucy Silag

Book Country Community and Engagement Manager


Mimi Speike
Posted: Saturday, September 21, 2013 9:29 AM
Joined: 11/17/2011
Posts: 1014


Hi Ront,

I am trying to connect with you, and I can't figure out how to do it. You try to connect with me.

.

I am five chapters into your book, and I am enjoying it, with a few points that I have to think about. I will read on, and comment when I have a good grasp of where you're going with it.


John B.
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 10:52 PM
Joined: 9/8/2013
Posts: 4


Hi, all, 
Another newcomer who heard about the site on public radio's On The Media a couple of weeks back. I've posted one review and will do more as I have time. And I posted my novel, Split Rock, and would love feedback on the whole thing or any fraction you care to read. Thanks in advance to any intrepid reviewers. It's good to be here. 
Best,

John B


Ront
Posted: Thursday, September 26, 2013 8:17 AM
Joined: 9/11/2013
Posts: 3


Hi John,

 

Welcome.  Happy to give your manuscript a read-- working through another right now, but I will put yours next up.

Best


Mimi Speike
Posted: Thursday, September 26, 2013 12:41 PM
Joined: 11/17/2011
Posts: 1014


Hi John,

.

Welcome. I too have things in line to be read, but I will add yours to my list. 


Lucy Silag
Posted: Thursday, September 26, 2013 4:42 PM
Joined: 6/7/2013
Posts: 1359


Hiya, @John B! Glad to hear that you've joined us! Welcome.

 

I am about to send you a connection request so that we can be in touch if you need any help getting involved with the site. I will also send you links to resources that might be useful to you as you get acclimated.

 

Thanks for introducing yourself--you are off to a great start!

 

Lucy Silag

Book Country Community and Engagement Manager


John B.
Posted: Thursday, September 26, 2013 5:52 PM
Joined: 9/8/2013
Posts: 4


Thank you Ront, Mimi, and Lucy!
Bret Plate
Posted: Tuesday, October 15, 2013 8:16 PM
Joined: 9/9/2013
Posts: 5


Hi, all.  Just joined Book Country after hearing the NPR story, too.  Have just posted a new book THE GELDED AGE, based on a script I had in development with two Disney producers awhile back.  It's posted in Comedic Fiction, though navigating where to slot work here is still a guessing game.  In any case, would love any feedback anyone has to offer.  Here's a small taste for anyone interested:

 

    “How are you feeling, Daddy?”

 

    “I feel like crap!  That’s how you feel when you’re dying,” he said, his voice collapsing into a fit of hacking.

 

     “Do you want me to come back later?” she said, a wave of sadness sweeping over her.

 

    She started to back away from the bed, but he waved her towards him.  “No.”  He started hacking again, so he just waved a hand feebly at her to come back.  “There’s something very important I want to tell you,” he said in wheezy whisper.

 

     She smiled tenderly at him through her tears.  This is what she had been waiting for -- a last expression of tenderness by a father for his daughter before he died.

 

     “I know what you’re going to say, Daddy.  I love you, too.”

 

    Gordon Jennings drew in a deep breath, as if saying words of tenderness was such an effort that it required squeezing as much extra air in between the growing pockets of phlegm in his lungs as possible.  Katherine smiled again, waiting quietly for the words she had waited her whole life to hear.

 

     “I’m very disappointed in….” 

 

      Weak with impending death, his voice trailed off at the end of the sentence, his body shuttering, his wheezing cough beginning to sound like the yapping bark of the irritating Pekingese that lived next door.  Katherine stared at her father in shock, wanting to believe she had misunderstood what he’d just said. 

 

    “You’re very disappointed in Jews?” she asked in astonishment.  


    It was certainly something her father might say, even though many of his colleagues were Jews.  His Jewish friends tended to believe in God, and her father was always complaining about anyone who wasn’t white, Anglo-Saxon, atheist and a rabid believer in the philosophies of Ayn Rand, the only fiction writer her father had ever read.  Bankers and lawyers, as far as he was concerned, had no use for God, the existent of God implying some inevitably to their station in life beyond their own moral and intellectual superiority and all that it did for America.  Believing in anything beyond that was like believing in fate – or worse yet, karma.  Fate, every banker knew, had nothing to do with success, and karma was just a crock of B-S invented by slackers and potheads to defend the inevitably of their own mediocrity. 

 

Cheers.  Look forward to a review or two! 

Bret

 

 

 


Lucy Silag
Posted: Wednesday, October 16, 2013 10:29 AM
Joined: 6/7/2013
Posts: 1359


Hey, @Bret! Great to see you sharing about your novel, THE GELDED AGE, and thanks for including a link!

 

Curious to know more about how you are making the transition from screenwriting to novels.

 

Lucy


DJS
Posted: Friday, December 6, 2013 12:13 PM
Bret: I enjoyed your piece of writing. You appear to have the discipline to keep your writing controlled and, as well, the talent to make it interesting. Keep up the good work.

DJS
Posted: Monday, December 16, 2013 12:22 PM

My book, The Commercial, has languished in the Erotica cul-de-sac since it was posted two months ago. The recent reorganization removed all but the current three titles, this trio being graphic examples of Erotica but a genre seldom explored. Many were culled but few are chosen. Having delivered nearly fifty messages and reviews, and honored to do so, is it too much to ask for at least a modicum of participation concerning my book from the many Book Country members? Especially sent the remaining chapters are about to be posted.

 

 

 



Mimi Speike
Posted: Monday, December 16, 2013 2:08 PM
Joined: 11/17/2011
Posts: 1014


DJS, I am curious about your work. I am reviewing at a glacial pace, in between trying to push ahead on my own book. You are on my list at number four, after one work on another site, and two on here. I wrapped up a review last night, after a month of reading and rereading. I put a lot of thought into my reviews, which is what you want, right?
Drew
Posted: Friday, January 17, 2014 10:51 AM
Joined: 1/14/2014
Posts: 2


Hello Workshoppery Friends!

 

I just posted a story yesterday to Literary Fiction called "Red and Rumbling"! I would so so so appreciate if you could read and review my collection. There are twelve short stories all about my experiences on my family farm. I will be adding more stories eventually, but wanted to get reviews on what I have so far. Thank you so much in advance for your help and support!!!

 

All the best,

Drew


Robin Gregory
Posted: Friday, March 28, 2014 5:46 PM
Joined: 3/1/2014
Posts: 4


Hello Everyone,

 

I'm new to Book Country. I've reviewed one short story so far, and am still figuring out how to navigate this site. I'm looking forward to seeing what you're doing and to hearing your responses to my work. The primary rule I follow when critiquing other writer's work is to look for and point out strengths before mentioning weaknesses. I like what the younger Paolo Coelho said he believed a writer was: "someone who wears glasses, never combs his hair, and has a duty and an obligation never to be understood by his own generation."  If you are one of these creatures, I already like you!

 

Warm regards,

Robin

--edited by Robin Gregory on 3/28/2014, 5:49 PM--


Lucy Silag - Book Country Community Manager
Posted: Monday, March 31, 2014 4:42 PM
Joined: 6/7/2013
Posts: 1359


Hi Robin!

 

Great to hear from you on this thread about new LitFic projects, and your post made me smile.

 

Just sent you a connection request so we can be in touch here on the site, and so that I can connect you to some other writers in this genre. Just let me know if you need anything!

 

Lucy

Book Country Community and Engagement Manager


DJ Pizzarello
Posted: Friday, April 18, 2014 10:47 AM
Joined: 3/8/2014
Posts: 4


I've just posted a short story entitled Angel or Mercy.  I hope to publish a collection of stories, and Angel of Mercy will be one of them.  A precis of the story follows this notice.  I'm looking for readers and reactions.  Thanks in advance.

 

Don Pizzarello

 

Marcus Ambrose, an ambitious college student, meets and falls in love with a beautiful young woman, Elena.  Elena's childhood was lonely.  She was an outsider, socially inept, an intrusion into her parents' lives.  She feels accepted only by sick and wounded animals that she finds, treats and cures. Marcus is so moved by Elena's goodness that he proposes, and they marry.  Their life is perfect by outside standards, but Elena doesn't enter fully into their relationship and continues to be ruled by the lonely child she was.  She gives herself more fully to damaged animals than to Marcus.  A chance encounter with a woman (witnessed by Elena) gives Marcus the impetus and courage to end the marriage, but on the day he plans to tell Elena, a freak accident renders him mute and paralyzed.  Elena can now love Marcus because he's like her animals, and she can be his angel of mercy.  Can Marcus manage to live in a marriage in which he's valued only for his disabilities and how?


DJ Pizzarello
Posted: Friday, April 18, 2014 10:49 AM
Joined: 3/8/2014
Posts: 4


I've just posted a short story entitled Angel of Mercy.  I hope to publish a collection of stories, and Angel of Mercy will be one of them.  A precis of the story follows this notice.  I'm looking for readers and reactions.  Thanks in advance.

 

Don Pizzarello

 

Marcus Ambrose, an ambitious college student, meets and falls in love with a beautiful young woman, Elena.  Elena's childhood was lonely.  She was an outsider, socially inept, an intrusion into her parents' lives.  She feels accepted only by sick and wounded animals that she finds, treats and cures. Marcus is so moved by Elena's goodness that he proposes, and they marry.  Their life is perfect by outside standards, but Elena doesn't enter fully into their relationship and continues to be ruled by the lonely child she was.  She gives herself more fully to damaged animals than to Marcus.  A chance encounter with a woman (witnessed by Elena) gives Marcus the impetus and courage to end the marriage, but on the day he plans to tell Elena, a freak accident renders him mute and paralyzed.  Elena can now love Marcus because he's like her animals, and she can be his angel of mercy.  Can Marcus manage to live in a marriage in which he's valued only for his disabilities and how?


DJ Pizzarello
Posted: Thursday, April 24, 2014 9:48 AM
Joined: 3/8/2014
Posts: 4


I recently joined Book Country and am excited about being a member.  I reviewed a short story, then posted one of my own called, Angel of Mercy.  I'm eager for comments and criticisms on this story from other members.  My work has been characterized as "literary horror" by people who've read my work, and Angel of Mercy is an example.  No ghosts, vampires, or things that go bump in the night, but horror nevertheless.  I hope to have readers soon and would like to connect with other writers in Book Country and read for them as well.

 

Don Pizzarello

Lucy Silag - Book Country Community Manager
Posted: Tuesday, April 29, 2014 4:11 PM
Joined: 6/7/2013
Posts: 1359


Hi DJ! Your story sounds absolutely fascinating . . . and horrifying!!! Thanks for posting this intro to it. And welcome to the community!

 

I am sending you a connection request. Let's be in touch so that I can help you as you learn your way around the site.

 

Lucy Silag


Book Country Community and Engagement Manager


Andrea Dunlop
Posted: Tuesday, June 17, 2014 1:51 PM
Joined: 11/19/2013
Posts: 5


 

Hi all - I've just posted a draft of my novel, The Sojourn and would love some reader feedback. I've included a description below: 

 

When thirty-year old Brooke Thompson unexpectedly runs into a man from her past, she’s plunged headlong into memories she’s long tried to forget. Catapulted back to her youth, Brooke relives the events of a decade before when she spent a year in France following a disastrous affair with a professor. There she developed a deep and complicated friendship with Sophie, a fellow American and stunning blonde whose golden girl façade hides a precarious emotional fragility. Their lives are forever changed when they meet sly, stylish French student Veronique and her impossibly sexy older cousin, Alex. The cousins draw the two girls into an irresistible world of art, money, decadence and ultimately, a disastrous love triangle that consumes them both. Of the two of them, only Brooke ever makes it home.  

 

 http://www.bookcountry.com/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=6833

PS- I'm a former in-house publicist and current social media and marketing director, so if anyone has questions in that area, please feel free to ask! 

 

Andrea 

--edited by Andrea Dunlop on 6/17/2014, 2:02 PM--


Cynthia Dagnal-Myron
Posted: Wednesday, July 23, 2014 3:23 AM
Joined: 7/23/2014
Posts: 1


Very new to Book Country, but not to writing, as my profile explains. I'm wondering if I can post a "work in progress," or must the book be a final draft? I would love to post a few chapters of my current novel here. This looks like a very exciting place to be!

 

Cyn


John B.
Posted: Monday, September 8, 2014 8:12 PM
Joined: 9/8/2013
Posts: 4


Hi all, 

 

I've just posted a new draft of my novel, Split Rock. Based in part on feedback received here, I went away and gave the ms another pass (or two), the main task being to clean up the writing and remove excess detail. I cut about 7,000 words from the last version posted here, removing a fair number of clinkers along the way. Feel like it's getting there. Do you agree? As always, I'm grateful to any readers and reviewers. 

 

J


Lucy Silag - Book Country Community Manager
Posted: Tuesday, September 9, 2014 1:00 PM
Joined: 6/7/2013
Posts: 1359


Hi John, glad to see you back on Book Country, and congrats on the big revision!

 

How did it feel to cut so many words? 7k is a lot!!

 

Lucy


John B.
Posted: Tuesday, September 9, 2014 9:24 PM
Joined: 9/8/2013
Posts: 4


Hey Lucy, thanks for your note.  Actually, it felt great. The book was pretty short already so I didn't think of it as having lots of fat, but after a couple of reviewers found the detail too much at times -- feedback I resisted at first -- I went back and saw the thing with fresh eyes. Meantime I looked up some word counts and realized Split Rock was (and is) still longer than, say, Gatsby, The Red Badge of Courage, and The Hours, to name a few half-respectable novels. I got kind of gleefully ruthless after that. 
Lucy Silag - Book Country Community Manager
Posted: Wednesday, September 10, 2014 10:37 AM
Joined: 6/7/2013
Posts: 1359


Haha, nice! Gleefully ruthless is a wonderful feeling to have while editing!
Val
Posted: Friday, January 30, 2015 11:13 AM
Joined: 9/7/2013
Posts: 24


Hi, fellow Lit Fic writers! I just posted more of my novel "Room to Spare" (don't know how to create a link, Lucy -- I assume you can put the title in the search box and find it that way - ?) Would welcome reviews on any or all aspects of it. Have to admit, I'm slightly terrified of all this because it really hasn't been critiqued yet; I figured I would wait until it's 100 percent done (although the members of my book club have given me some feedback on ideas.) I'm finding it difficult to work on the novel - I'd like to finish it and be ready to look for an agent within a year - AND review others' work, as well as accomplish the more mundane tasks of life such as sleeping and eating. Anyhow, thanks!
Val
Posted: Friday, January 30, 2015 11:23 AM
Joined: 9/7/2013
Posts: 24


DJ, the premise of "Angel of Mercy" sounds totally original - will check it out!
Val
Posted: Wednesday, May 27, 2015 5:18 PM
Joined: 9/7/2013
Posts: 24


Another point: while anyone is obviously free to review anything in any genre, I feel strongly that people should stick to what they know. So, for example, if you write only fantasy or horror, don't go reviewing a very character-driven story. (Which is not to say that characters in fantasy and horror can't or shouldn't be well-developed.) Some reviewers talk a lot about info-dumps - a lot of exposition - as a death knell. But if you take a look at "Freedom," which won the National Book Award, there is tons of exposition. Same for "The Corrections" by the same author. And these so-called info-dumps are incredibly interesting (and vital to the novel) because of the author's talent. Anyhow, I don't think you can apply the same "rules" across the board to all genres of fiction. . . or that there are strict rules, for that matter, that should never be broken. I just picked two beta readers for my book and I considered what kinds of books they like to read to make sure they were similar to the one I'm writing. I wouldn't have picked them if they both read nothing but romance novels
A.E. Skeen
Posted: Thursday, June 18, 2015 7:10 PM
Joined: 9/8/2013
Posts: 7


Hello Literary Fiction group, 

 

 I just posted a draft of a novel, called "This is not a Memoire, True Times with Two Husbands" by Katherine Cleary (see: http://www.bookcountry.com/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=809

This is my first full length novel posted to Book Country. Hoping to find some real readers out there.

 

About the Book:

This is an Irish-American style novel set in Washington DC and Central North West Africa. Jeanette, a neo-abolitionist human rights activist arrives in a country ruled by ecstatic mystical religious fervor and neo-patriarchalism. Jeanette is married with children and normally lives in Washington DC, but when traveling for work she falls deeply in love with Amadou, a local human rights activist. They are drawn together by their common fight against slavery. Can their love be more than an enchanted moment? What about Mick, left behind in DC? Can Jeanette, a white woman, really tell us this story of two husbands? Whose controlling this narrative anyway? Will she be demapped?

 

About the Author:

Katherine Cleary feels herself the avatar of her great-grandmother who supported her five children writing poems and stories. She brings vast learning and experience to this novel, and is not afraid of sultry sex scenes, living without a flush toilet, literary play, or questioning the pursuit of human rights.

 

Author's Note:

Any fans of Infinite Jest out there? Madame Psychosis lives on in this book. Can love overcome the psychotic present moment of globalized misery? Billionaires party while billions starve and millions languish in slavery. Our protagonist sets out to try to end some of that misery only to fall in love, half a world away from home. Hence ensues her struggle for her soul, her career, her story, her love.

- See more at: http://www.bookcountry.com/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=8098#sthash.mRuraO3e.dpuf

 

Again, here is the link to my manuscript: http://www.bookcountry.com/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=8098

 

Any recommendations on drafts that I should read?

 

 

 

--edited by A.E. Skeen on 6/19/2015, 7:46 AM--


Lucy Silag - Book Country Director
Posted: Friday, June 19, 2015 9:17 AM
Joined: 6/7/2013
Posts: 1359


Hi AE, Thanks for posting about your book! It sounds fascinating!

 

Tell us about the title and the spelling of memoir ("memoire") here. Is that significant?


katie78
Posted: Friday, June 19, 2015 6:43 PM
Joined: 4/8/2015
Posts: 49


nother place to look for literary fiction is under woomen's fiction, which is often just litfic with a female mc.

 

like my book- finding charlie- smart women's fiction about sisters dealing with the repercussions of maternal abbandonment. it opens with the mysterious disappearance of olivia's younger sister- charlie. 

RAVI RANJAN GOSWAMI
Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2015 3:03 AM
Joined: 4/2/2015
Posts: 2


I have posted two literary fictions
1-The Robbers' Hill a novelette

2-The Seven Shades,short stories.


TPNiedermann
Posted: Monday, July 20, 2015 10:32 PM
Joined: 2/21/2013
Posts: 40


My novel, Wall of Dust, is now available for free download on Smashwords (and soon on Kindle). This will last until July 31. The coupon number for Smashwords is HH45J. All I ask is that if you read it, you post a review on Smashwords and/or Amazon. Thanks! A review and description follow. Any and all comments and criticism are welcome.

Wall of Dust is a novel both timely and timeless in its examination of the perpetual devastation and suffering in the daily lives of those trapped by the conflicts of Palestine and Israel. Like Amy Wilentz’s Martyrs’ Crossing, it tells a stunning story of divided loyalties, love, fear, and personal sacrifice. Tim Niedermann’s sensitive narrative is, on its own, a compelling story about a woman who must make moral choices in her life. But there is a bigger gift here: only novels such as this let us begin to feel deeply the true complex realities for so many people on both sides of this endless struggle in the Middle East.”— Katharine Weber, author of Triangle, True Confections, The Music Lesson

Wall of Dust is a story of the human spirit—of the pain of loss and the struggle to recover. Aisha, a Palestinian schoolteacher, becomes deranged after most of her class is accidentally killed by a missile fired from an Israeli gunship. She begins on a strange ritual, throwing stones at the “security barrier,” the eight-meter tall concrete wall that separates much of the West Bank from Israel.  She shouts the name of each dead child and hurls a stone at the concrete monolith. Initially alone, she is soon joined by others and her little ritual takes the form of a mass protest. At several points she might be stopped, or worse, but she is helped in small but significant ways by several other characters, Israeli and Palestinian. Each character who intercedes has experienced a loss—a career dead end, a family estrangement, a crisis of faith, a simple loss of hope—that guides their actions. The acts are small and personal: a sniper misses a shot, a teacher comforts, a stranger embraces, a father forgives, an Islamist relents. Lyrically written, full of compassion for the people of Palestine and Israel and for the land they inhabit together, Wall of Dust is a story of revelation, redemption, and the persistence of hope.

 


Kate Sebeny
Posted: Tuesday, January 12, 2016 12:15 PM
Joined: 1/12/2016
Posts: 4


Hi, Nevena!

 

I'm new to Book Country and am wondering if I can post a prologue for a novel-in-progress and then ask reviewers questions about it. (E.g., What does the reader expect from the novel after reading this prologue?) If so, what's the best way to go about doing this?

 

Many thank, Kate Sebeny


nate1952
Posted: Tuesday, January 12, 2016 5:19 PM
Joined: 5/12/2015
Posts: 41


Kate:

 

Judging by what I've seen, so far, the pace of review here is a little languid. Some listings remain untouched, even after months.

 

So you may wish to recruit volunteers - tell them when you've posted this material - and then remind them to answer your Big Question about the prologue.

 

You will then have a chance to comment on their comments - and the dialogue can go on from there.

 

- Nate Briggs (SLC)

 

 

 


 

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